"Horses Dream Of Being Trained The Way A Donkey Demands To Be Trained" Melody Johnson

Posts from the ‘farm’ category

What Big Ears You Have


MY WHAT BIG EARS YOU HAVE!

Often we get the sweetest inquiries from children asking, “Why do donkeys have such big ears?”. It is a really good question.

Donkeys are desert dwellers and are native to dry, hot climates with sparse, woody vegetation. Unlike horses, donkeys do not cluster in tight herds for grazing in abundant grass lands. Donkeys spread out over large dry environments browsing and rooting up woody vegetation. Often a specific donkey herd will be spread out over a mile or more browsing. It has been determined that Mother Nature, in all of her wisdom, designed donkeys with large ears so they could communicate at great distances. Literally, donkey ears act as long distance antennas receiving vital communication from other herd members. This information is imperative to the survival and safety of the herd.

Secondly, research has shown that donkey’s ears act as a cooling agent. Due to their large surface area donkey ears are able to sweat and cool a donkey’s overall body temperature. These automatic cooling devices are critical to survival in hot desert temperatures.

So, ‘long ears’ are not simply adorable, but they are inherently functional and vital to donkey survival.

Source: Kelly Probst

Donkey Whisperer Farm

http://www.donkeywhisperer.com

Donkey Rope Halter Made To Fit Your Donkey Not A Horse Head


Select Our Store to order your donkey halter/lead line. Free shipping in the U.S.A. Made in the U.S.A. with quality yacht rope to never mold. Dirty? Wash in a bucket of warm soapy water and let dry. Brass screw on snap will help you train your donkey and makes adding a longer or shorter lead line a breeze.

 

Source: Donkey Rope Halter Made To Fit Your Donkey Not A Horse Head

Melody Johnson, Donkey Whisperer Farm, LLC

Select  OUR STORE

http://wwwyouversion.com/mobile

http://www.donkeywhisperer.com

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Lost In Translation


LOST IN TRANSLATION

I spent several years as an assistant to a trainer at an upscale Rocky Mountain Gaited Horse ranch where we bred, trained and showed over 30 horses. I watched trainers come and trainers go and the reason was always the same: the trainer could not teach what she/he was training to the owner. The trainer would forge an amazing connection and bond to the horse, but this bond, this mutual respect, this communication could not be transferred to the owner. When the owner would interact with the horse the horse was confused, the owner perplexed and soon the trainer fired. Why? The owner expected the horse to respond to him/her like the horse responded to the trainer. This simply never happened. I witnessed this ‘disconnect’ over and over again. Something was lost in translation.

Now donkeys. After 12 years at a donkey ranch I witnessed the same phenomena. Trainers came and trainers went. We even sent our donkeys to trainers off site. Each time I witnessed the donkey join up with the trainer, learn the trainers language, intuit the trainers every move; they were like a fine tuned instrument together. Finally the donkey returned home. The owner entered the scene and everything fell apart. Why wouldn’t the donkey respond to the owner? Why wouldn’t the donkey behave and perform for the owner like he/she did for the trainer? The trainer revealed some of his/her secrets, why couldn’t the owner apply the techniques, why couldn’t the owner speak the language?

It is my personal experience that only owners should be training their equine. Only YOU should be training your donkey! So, what does this mean? In today’s world of technology this is actually good news. With the internet, Skype, Facetime and YouTube there are infinite possibilities for you to learn to train your donkey. If you can obtain a college degree online, email our doctor and learn to play an instrument online, well, you can certainly learn to train our donkey through virtual resources.

So, where to go?

Donkey Whisperer Farm has been on the cutting edge training you the owner to train your donkey. Trainer Melody Johnson offers a basic training course through the Donkey 101 Video Series and does personal one-on-one training sessions through Skype. She teaches you ‘donkey language’, she teaches you how to translate and communicate with your donkey. She teaches you how to join up and energetically bond with your donkey. She teaches you how to send clear messages verbally and with your body language. She trains you to train your donkey basic manners and skills.

When YOU train your donkey there is no middleman. There is no disconnect, there is no confusion, there is no language barrier. When you train your donkey you forge a lifetime bond and commitment and nothing is lost in translation.

We invite you to learn more about Donkey Whisperer Farm online training resources at www.donkeywhisperer.com

Image may contain: night and horse

 

Source: Kelly Probst

 

Select Donkey 101 Video On Demand as we train the owner to train the donkey from the comfort of your home.

Select Donkey Rope Halter for sale (mini, standard and Mammoth) with matching lead lines.

Melody Johnson, Donkey Whisperer Farm, LLC

Select  OUR STORE

http://wwwyouversion.com/mobile

http://www.donkeywhisperer.com

https://www.facebook.com/Donkeywhisperer

On The Front Line Of EPM – Donkey, Horse and Mule


Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) doesn’t make headlines as often as it once did. But this potentially debilitating neurological disease remains a threat to horses all over the United States. If anything, its range is spreading.

Select On The Front Line Of EPM

Select HOW TO PREVENT EPM

Therefore, a primary objective in disease prevention should be to minimize stress so a horse’s immune system can operate at maximal capacity. Witonsky comments, “At this time, we still don’t know why some horses develop disease, although based on studies and on my clinical impression, stress from showing, shipping, training, etc. seems to be a risk factor for increased incidence of disease. As a trainer or owner, it is important to be sensitive to what one’s horse believes is stressful, and try to be observant for subtle changes in behavior and performance which could be due to EPM. If a horse does develop disease, hopefully it will be detected early in the onset of disease. In that way, an infected horse can be started on treatment as early as possible to minimize and prevent horse losses and to improve overall outcome with regard to return to overall health and performance.”

Bill Saville, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, professor and chair in the Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine at The Ohio State University, and his colleagues investigated risk factors for development of EPM. In this study they acknowledged the important role of the immune system in fending off disease.

“When animals are stressed, suppressive proteins produced by the central nervous system are released and lead to suppression of lymphocyte production and function,” said Saville.

This, coupled with elevated cortisol levels related to stress, might increase a horse’s risk of developing EPM.

Control Measures to Reduce Risk

Saville’s comprehensive study (Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 2000) revealed the following findings that tell us how we can more effectively prevent EPM in our horses:

Age The highest risk of infection occurred in horses aged 1-5 years. This could be due to the use of young horses in competitive situations and the associated stress.

Opossums Presence of opossums on a farm poses an increased risk.

Location Horses on farms with previously EPM-infected horses had a higher risk of developing EPM, likely due to the presence of protozoa in the feed or water and increased likelihood of exposure.

Seasonal effects More EPM cases occur in spring, summer, and fall, possibly related to hot weather acting as a stressor, as well as this being a time of increased travel to competitions with accompanying transport stress affecting the immune system.

Stress An association of stressful events (such as injury, accidents, foaling, surgery, transport, and illness) with increased risk might be related to suppression of a horse’s immune system.

Natural water source Presence of water sources (creek or river) on the farm provided a preferred habitat for opossums away from the horse barns, thereby decreasing exposure and risk.

Food storage Securing feed and water sources from opossum fecal contamination is important in limiting exposure and risk.

It is important to limit opossum presence since sporocysts (the infective stage of the protozoon) are able to survive for as much as a year in the environment. Additionally, birds feed on insects and plant material in the feces of opossums, thereby serving as a vehicle to disseminate sporocysts in the environment. David Granstrom, DVM, PhD, one of the pioneer researchers of EPM when he worked at the University of Kentucky, emphasizes how environmental management can go a long way toward limiting infection.

“It looks like the only way to clean barns that is effective and will not destroy the barn is by the heat of steam cleaning.” –Dr. David Granstrom

“It’s most important to protect feed and the local environment from contamination with opossum feces,” states Granstrom. “Protect livestock feeds and hay from opossums. Keep the local area free of anything that attracts opossums, such as pet food, garbage, and carrion.”

Saville says it isn’t easy to kill the parasites in the environment, and sporocysts are resistant to even the most intense disinfectants.

Granstrom adds, “It looks like the only way to clean barns that is effective and will not destroy the barn is by the heat of steam cleaning.”

Because disinfectant foot baths will not impact sporocysts, it is suggested to change boots or use disposable boot covers in areas where there is the potential for barn contamination.

 

Source: The Horse & Equis links are attached to this blog.

Melody Johnson, Donkey Whisperer Farm, LLC

Select  OUR STORE

http://wwwyouversion.com/mobile

http://www.donkeywhisperer.com

https://www.facebook.com/Donkeywhisperer

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